TAMU Cotton Engineering & Management

FAQs

What is Air Pollution?

Air Pollution is the presence in the outdoor atmosphere of any one or more substances or pollutants in quantities-which are or may be harmful or injurious to human heath or welfare, animal or plant life, or property (Health Effect’s Standard) Air Pollution is the presence in the outdoor atmosphere of any one or more substances or pollutants in quantities-which unreasonably interfere with the enjoyment of life or property, including outdoor recreation (Nuisance Standard)

Why establish CAAQES?

TAMU has the talent in Science and Engineering: 
-to provide the research solutions that are economical and effective; 
-to teach undergraduate and graduate courses in Air Pollution Engineering; 
-to transfer the new knowledge to the agricultural industry; and 
-to provide national leadership in Air Quality Engineering and Science.

What are the problems facing agricultural operations?

Agricultural operations are faced with regulatory activities by State Air Pollution Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAs) brought about by EPA mandates!
The problem is the serious economic impact of air pollution regulations on agricultural operations.

What classifies as Agricultural Air Pollution?

-Particulate Matter (PM10 /PM2.5) 
-Odor 
-National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) 
-Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPS) 
-Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) 
-Ammonia and Hydrogen Sulfide (NH3 and H2S)

What is the role of CAAQES in air pollution engineering?

The main role of CAAAQES is to address all the current issues on air pollution confronting agricultural operations through sound engineering and science.

Agricultural Activities are affected by the lack of Sound Science and Engineering:

-CAFO: cattle feed yards, swine, poultry and dairy operations 
-Grain elevators, feed mills and oil mills 
-Cotton gins 
-Agricultural burning 
-Field operations

Introduce Economical and Effective Abatement Strategies:

-Best Management Practices (BMP) 
-Best Available Control Technology (BACT) 
-Cyclones/filters/etc 
-Management strategies 
-Title V Permitting

Audiences Involved:

-Agriculture 
-EPA/SAPRA 
-Public 
-Industry Consultants 
-Academia

Rural-Urban Interface Issues:

-Odors: nuisance 
-NAAQS: health effects 
-Zoning, legal 
-TSP/PM10/PM2.5 
-Non attainment 
-CERCLA (Superfund Act)

What are the current National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)?

Under the current federal law, NAAQSs have been established for six pollutants: particulate matter (PM10), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone and lead (40 CFR 50). These standards are presented in Table 1.

Table 1. National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQSs) ( Ref: EPA - http://www.epa.gov/air/criteria.html )

National Ambient Air Quality Standards

  Primary Standards Secondary Standards
Pollutant Level Averaging Time Level Averaging Time
Carbon 
Monoxide
9 ppm 
(10 mg/m3)
8-hour 
None
35 ppm 
(40 mg/m3)
1-hour 
Lead 0.15 µg/m3  Rolling 3-Month Average
Same as Primary
Nitrogen 
Dioxide
53 ppb Annual 
(Arithmetic Average)
Same as Primary
100 ppb 1-hour 
None
Particulate 
Matter (PM10)
150 µg/m3 24-hour 
Same as Primary
Particulate 
Matter (PM2.5)
15.0 µg/m3
Annual  
(Arithmetic Average)
Same as Primary
35 µg/m3 24-hour 
Same as Primary
Ozone 0.075 ppm 
(2008 std)
8-hour 
Same as Primary
0.08 ppm 
(1997 std)
8-hour 
Same as Primary
0.12 ppm 1-hour 
Same as Primary
Sulfur 
Dioxide
0.03 ppm 
(1971 std)
Annual 
(Arithmetic Average)

0.5 ppm

3-hour 

0.14 ppm 
(1971 std)
24-hour 
75 ppb  1-hour
None